Writing is an art, not just a science

Here at creative virtuosity we often write content on our pages in open form. But don’t let our writing style sway your views. We are technically minded. Our goal is to understand the science of technology to better assist businesses in their documentation needs.

creative virtuosity is a registered sole proprietorship, founded in 2009. We offer confidence of performance to any business seeking reputable remote technical writing services.Our in-house technology includes: Robohelp 2015 – 2017, Microsoft Office 2016, Visio 2016, Sharepoint, Adobe Acrobat DC, Skype, and Visual Studio with Team Services.

Is Artificial Intelligence really a threat?

The threat of artificial intelligence rears its head as recent phenomena targeted toward courtroom proceedings. Its story, covered by DailyMail.com on September 22, 2017, boasts scientific design of “a machine-learning algorithm that can accurately predict over 70 percent of Supreme Court decisions. “

So how much of this technology is artificial intelligence and a threat to society? We can assess this based on previous courtroom decisions.  In 1977, the Supreme Court of the United States vacated and remanded decision in Gardner v. Florida.  “The Petitioner was denied due process of law when the death sentence was imposed by the Florida Supreme Court, at least in part, on the basis of information that he had no opportunity to deny or explain,” stated Justice Stevens. The information utilized in the case was an informational report which held information of which Gardner was unware.

On July 13, 2016, a similar report was utilized for sentencing of Eric M. Loomis and evaluated on appeal by the Wisconsin Supreme Court.  The report was comprised of a proprietary algorithm utilized by the COMPAS system which scales violence and recidivism risk principles as part of case triage.   In its opinion, the Wisconsin Supreme Court stated, “The court of appeals certified the specific question of whether the use of a COMPAS risk assessment at sentencing violates a defendant’s right to due process, either because the proprietary nature of COMPAS prevents defendants from challenging the COMPAS assessment’s scientific validity, or because COMPAS assessments take gender into account.”  The court determined, “if used properly, observing the limitations and cautions set forth herein, a circuit court’s consideration of a COMPAS risk assessment at sentencing does not violate a defendant’s right to due process,” further explaining its reasoning for decision was supported by other independent factors; thus, the risk assessment use was not a determinative.

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